in #CASE you were curious about: The Moon

in #CASE you were curious about: The Moon

July 20th is National Moon Day! This day commemorates the day man first walked on the moon in 1969. At the time, NASA reported the moon landing as being “…the single greatest technological achievement of all time.” My how times have changed! It was back July 20th, 1969, that Apollo 11 landed the first humans, Americans Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, on the moon. Armstrong stepped first onto the lunar surface, six hours after landing and spent two and a half hours outside the spacecraft. Aldrin spent slightly less time but together they collected 47.5-pounds of lunar material to bring back to Earth.

Who “watched the car?” Michael Collins piloted Apollo 11 and remained alone in orbit until Armstrong and Aldrin returned. Watched by millions, the event was broadcast on live TV to a worldwide audience and all witnessed as Armstrong stepped onto the lunar surface and described the event as “one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.” This momentous day became officially recognized with a proclamation by President Richard Nixon in 1971.

The rise and fall of the tides on Earth is caused by the Moon – There are two bulges in the Earth due to the gravitational pull that the Moon exerts; one on the side facing the Moon, and the other on the opposite side that faces away from the Moon, The bulges move around the oceans as the Earth rotates, causing high and low tides around the globe.

The Moon is drifting away from the Earth – The Moon is moving approximately 3.8 cm away from our planet every year. It is estimated that it will continue to do so for around 50 billion years. By the time that happens, the Moon will be taking around 47 days to orbit the Earth instead of the current 27.3 days.

A person would weigh much less on the Moon – The Moon has much weaker gravity than Earth, due to its smaller mass, so you would weigh about one sixth (16.5%) of your weight on Earth. This is why the lunar astronauts could leap and bound so high in the air.

The Moon has only been walked on by 12 people; all American males – The first man to set foot on the Moon in 1969 was Neil Armstrong on the Apollo 11 mission, while the last man to walk on the Moon in 1972 was Gene Cernan on the Apollo 17 mission. Since then the Moon has only be visited by unmanned vehicles.

The dark side of the moon is a myth – In reality both sides of the Moon see the same amount of sunlight however only one face of the Moon is ever seen from Earth. This is because the Moon rotates around on its own axis in exactly the same time it takes to orbit the Earth, meaning the same side is always facing the Earth. The side facing away from Earth has only been seen by the human eye from spacecraft.

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